Download the Free Fishpond App!
Download on the App Store

Android App on Google play
Cafe Europa: Life After Communism

Already own it?

Sell Yours
Home » Books » Nonfiction » Social Sciences » Anthropology » Cultural

Cafe Europa

Life After Communism

By Slavenka Drakulic

Elsewhere $28.84 $23.50   Save $5.34 (19%)
Price includes NZ wide delivery!
Ships from USA
Rating:
 
Register or sign-in to rate and get recommendations.
Format: Paperback, 224 pages
Published In: United Kingdom, 01 February 1999
Today in Eastern Europe the architectural work of revolution is complete: the old order has been replaced by various forms of free-market economy and de jure democracy. But as Slavenka Drakulic observes, "in everyday life, the revolution consists much more of the small things - of sounds, looks and images. In this brilliant work of political reportage filtered through her own experience, we see that Europe remains a divided continent. In the place of the fallen Berlin Wall, there is a chasm between East and West, consisting of the different way people continue to live and understand the world. Are these differences a communist legacy, or do they run even deeper? What divides us today? To say simply that it is the understanding of the past, or a different concept of time, is not enough. But a visitor to this part of the world will soon discover that the Eastern Europeans live in another time zone. They live in the twentieth century, but at the same time they inhabit a past full of myths and fairy tales, of blood and national belonging.

About the Author

Slavenka Drakulic was born in Croatia in 1949. The author of several works of nonfiction and novels, she has written for The New York Times, The Nation, The New Republic, and numerous publications around the world.

Reviews

Drakuli'c '(How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed, LJ 3/15/93) has a rare reporting talent. She observes country soil rising from beneath urban asphalt, and she knows how to explain to urbane reader the passions and desires of a marginalized Eastern culture. The specter of an international European community may be a mundane sidebar in Western newspapers, but for Drakuli'c it represents far more. Diapers, royalty, Bucharest toilets, and presumptuous cafés serve as apocryphal symbols in her collection of political essays. To the daughter of an antifascist hero, the West represents the realization that money can transcend the future and that there is more to life than the "living in the present" that communism offered. Rather than using the language of traditional economic and political analysis, Drakuli'c offers the language of everyday life to describe a momentous cultural evolution. This important book from a very talented European writer is highly recommended. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 10/15/96.]‘Mary Hemmings, Univ. of Calgary Lib., Alberta

Drakulic (How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed) notes that Eastern Europeans are so anxious to become like their Western counterparts that every city and town has a Café Europa that is a pale imitation of similar establishments in Paris and Rome. She presents here a collection of essays that explore life in various Eastern European countries since the fall of communism. As a citizen of Croatia (formerly a part of Yugoslavia) living now in Vienna with her Swedish husband, she writes knowingly as a survivor of a communist regime, as one who realizes that pitfalls still lie ahead for nations emerging from the Soviet yoke. In Albania, she observes rage everywhere in people who seem to want to smash all vestiges of the Hoxha regime. In Romania, she comments on the execrable state in which public toilets are maintained: "[T]he standard of Romanian toilets reflects the nature of the communist system of which it is a legacy"; "the absence of any improvement is... a warning for the future of democracy" there. Drakulic's pungent and insightful ruminations not only describe life in her part of the world‘she makes us feel it as well. Author tour. (Feb.)

EAN: 9780140277722
ISBN: 0140277722
Publisher: Penguin Books
Dimensions: 19.8 x 12.8 x 1.4 centimetres (0.19 kg)
Age Range: 15+ years
Tell a friend

Their Email:

Sell Yours

Already own this item?
Sell Yours and earn some cash. It's fast and free to list! (Learn More.)

1 review(s)
All Reviews
1
1
on
 
A fascinating read. Drakulic flicks between the difficulties of buying nappies in Croatia, and whether a known war criminal should be made to pay, in a truly convincing fashion. Filled with questions about identity, nationalism and basic human instincts - not to mention a few amusing tales!

Review this Product

BAD GOOD
 

Related Searches

 

Webmasters, Bloggers & Website Owners

You can earn a 5% commission by selling Cafe Europa: Life After Communism on your website. It's easy to get started - we will give you example code. After you're set-up, your website can earn you money while you work, play or even sleep!

 

Authors/Publishers

Are you the Author/Publisher? Improve sales by submitting additional information on this title.

 

This item ships from and is sold by Fishpond.com, Inc.