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Where the Bodies Are Buried
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When JAI MCDIARMID is violently murdered and left in a back alley of Glasgow, no one is surprised. A heroin dealer who was openly sleeping with a drug trafficker's girlfriend, McDiarmid led a life which seems to have made him a multitude of enemies, providing the police with a large list of suspects responsible for his death. Detective Superintendent CATHERINE MCLEOD intends to investigate all angles of the case. A mother of two, Catherine occasionally fears that her commitment to work is putting unneeded strain on her marriage. Her love of the job, though, means that she never intends to relinquish her badge. Catherine ventures into the city's rougher areas to question McDiarmid's friends, harboring the belief that, in Glasgow, a murder is exactly as it seems.
Meanwhile, inexperienced private investigator JASMINE STEEL is shadowing a man suspected of committing insurance fraud. A failed actress who has returned to Glasgow after the death of her single mother, Jasmine begins training as a private eye out of economic necessity. Her mother's cousin--a man who she affectionately refers to as UNCLE JIM--is a retired detective who began an investigation service to pad his small pension. Jim takes her in and tries to teach her his trade. However, Jasmine's approach to her work is amateurish, as evidenced by her nervous response when she helps Jim by following the insurance fraud suspect he is tailing. Spotted and confronted by the suspect, she barely saves the situation by acting her way out of it.
The next day, Jasmine cannot get in contact with Jim; he's neither at his house nor answering his cell-phone. Fearing the worst, she contacts the police, who are reluctant to begin a search. With no other option, she takes it upon herself to find Jim, beginning by searching open case files. She finds only two: GLEN FALLAN and ANNE RAMSAY. As she debates her next move, she is startled by Detective MCDADE, who has let himself into the office. MCDADE apologizes, identifying himself as an old police friend of Jim's. After reviewing the two cases which Jasmine intends to investigate, he warns her about Glen Fallan. Jasmine wonders why Jim would have the case file at all; according to McDade, Glen Fallan has been dead for twenty years. Inside the old hit-man's file, Jasmine finds another name (TRON INGRAMS) as well as an address. Intrigued, she sets off to meet him.
Meanwhile, Catherine continues investigating the McDiarmid murder, finding little help or clues when questioning the seedy clientele of the city's dingy pubs and greasy spoons. She learns that almost everyone knew of the relationship between McDiarmid and mobster Gary Fleeting's girlfriend--even Fleeting himself, who makes it abundantly clear that the relationship did not bother him. With her original theory (that Fleeting killed him) finding little support, Catherine seeks help from another detective: the well-polished ABERCORN, head of the Organized Crime Unite Special Task Force (acronym: LOCUST). Catherine regards him as an ineffective "political" policeman and does not fully trust him; they begin working together, though, to keep the case from going cold.
Outside of Glasgow, Jasmine discovers that Tron's residence is actually a safe house for battered women; Tron helps with the yard and housework of the institution when needed. He appears to be a man of little words, and tells Jasmine he has no interest in talking to her. Undeterred, she sticks with him in the hope of learning something about her uncle's disappearance. Tron tells her nothing on their drive to a local store; however, he also notices a suspicious looking Audi following them. Cautiously, Tron slows down his car to see the passengers--just as the cars are even, the occupants in the Audi (wearing masks to hide their faces) begin shooting at them. With surprising expertise, Tron maneuvers the car out of the way, then gets out and begins firing a previously hidden pistol at the would-be assassins. As the car speeds away, the passenger dropping his shotgun in the process, Jasmine confronts Tron about actually being Glen Fallan. He vehemently denies this. With the shotgun and pistol safely stowed away in Tron's car, they both return to Jim's office--which they find has been broken into. In addition to wiping the computer hard drive, burglars have stolen the Glen Fallan case file. Fearing that Jim is dead and now worried for Jasmine's safety, Tron essentially instates himself as Jasmine's partner, renting her a hotel room and keeping a watchful eye over her.
Still at a stand-still with the murder case, Catherine meets with veteran police officer BOB CAIRNS. While discussing suspects, Cairns receives a call from an informant: there's a potential bomb threat at Glasgow Central train station. Rushing to the scene, they clear the station and bring in search dogs--they find no explosives, but do discover a large shipment of heroin in one of the lockers. As Catherine and the other officers congratulate each other on a job well done, another discovery is made: while they were searching for a phantom bomb, a jewelry store in the station had all of its merchandise stolen.
Now with Tron as a "partner," Jasmine goes to visit Anne Ramsay, the other of Jim's open cases. Orphaned at age four, both of Ramsay's parents and her little brother inexplicably went missing. Despite the disappearance's becoming a sensationalized national story, the police never fully committed to finding them. Ramsay retells the story and informs the new partners that the only person claiming to see her family was William Baine, who had given his account to the police and newspapers several days after the story had been sensationalized by the press. They then visit and question an abusive, slovenly Baine; Jasmine poses as a reporter and Tron, posing as a photographer, stays hidden behind a camera. While Jasmine asks polite questions, Tron continually interjects but keeps his face hidden. When Tron eventually reveals himself, Baine reacts with surprise and fear, announcing that Tron is really Glen Fallan.
Catherine receives a phone call from Abcercorn, informing her that: (1) the heroin in the station was extremely low-grade, undoubtedly placed there as a ruse, and (2) he has apprehended the jewelry store thief. After questioning him, Catherine learns that there was heroin at the station, but that it was removed by several older men dressed as police officers during the bomb threat. Abercorn suspects that the reappearance of Glen Fallan makes him chief suspect in the bombing threat and the McDiarmid case. Catherine, though, is skeptical. However, her chief suspects are all tortured and murdered, forcing her to question the simplicity of the case, when someone driving what appears to be Jasmine's car opens fire on her, attempting to kill her. Catherine survives unhurt, but convinced of Fallan's guilt. Tracking Jasmine's license plate, she finds the two at their hotel, noticing their bizarre camaraderie and unwillingness to talk. Catherine leaves them, no longer sure of Fallan's guilt.
After Catherine leaves, Jasmine returns a phone call to Scottish Gas for what she believes will be a routine call relating to billing; she discovers, though, that the call is from Jim's friend, who works with the company. Jim had been attempting to get aerial infrared photographs of Glasgow after hearing of 'the Necropolis'--areas in which warmth show up on maps due to decomposing bodies. He wanted data from the late seventies and early eighties, and Jasmine figures that he had traced the Ramsay's bodies to an area outside of Glasgow called Campsie Hills. While scanning the area, Fallan tells Jasmine of his life: the son of a vicious and corrupt police officer, her spent his life working as a hit-man and fixer for Glasgow crime lords. However, he states plainly that he left that life behind twenty years ago and has no intention of going back to it. In a flash-back scene following this, the readers are told the Ramsays' fate. After dinner, the Ramsays stopped by the Campsie Hills, where they made love on the grass--then witnessed a murder in the quarry below; because of this, the Ramsays were murdered, but their son was spared.
Realizing that the Ramsays' son is still alive, and after discovering that Jim wasn't interested in Baine but his wife, who works as a midwife, Jasmine returns to Glasgow. They confirm that Baine's wife made a false birth certificate for the Ramsay baby, then confront the police - having noticed the child's false name, Fallan believes that his father's old friends are behind the murders, and that they killed Jim for uncovering it.
With the police's help, Fallan devises a sting operation for capturing the corrupt officers. Catherine calls McDade and feigns helplessness, expressing fear of Fallan and wanting him to come over to Jim's office. When he does, gun in hand, Fallan surprises him, disarms him, and forces him to confess to everything while they drive out to Campsie Hills. When they arrive, though, McDade's fellow police corrupt police officers are there, guns trained on them. At this point, things become clear to the reader: the officers killed the Ramsays after they witnessed them killing someone and burying their body. The officers also confess to taking a large shipment of heroin from the police station and murdering all of Catherine's suspects, the last of which served two purposes: ensuring that they would not be caught, that they would have no competition when selling the drugs. As they ready to kill Jasmine and frame Fallan for her murder, Jasmine lets them know that they've been set up--not only was the officers' confession heard by Catherine and Abercorn, but all of the corrupt policemen have sniper's laser targets pointed directly at them.
The novel concludes with Jasmine making a surprise visit to Fallan after Jim's funeral. He seems domesticated as he works on clearing his yard of fallen leaves. Jasmine informs him that, through Jim's financial records, she learned that Fallan had been making payments to her mother for over twenty years. The novel concludes with Catherine readying herself to say four difficult words.
Product Details

About the Author

Since his award-winning debut novel Quite Ugly One Morning, Christopher Brookmyre has established himself as one of Britain's leading crime novelists. He has worked as a journalist for several British newspapers and is the author of twelve novels, including One Fine Day in The Middle of the Night, Quite Ugly One Morning, and Not The End of The World.

Reviews

"Glasgow's mean streets come alive, and author Brookmyre puts his readers in the shoes of the people who walk them. Surely Where the Bodies are Buried is one of the best novels of the year."--John Lutz, New York Times bestselling and Edgar award-winning author "Sharp, crafty, hard-edged and full of heart--Where the Bodies Are Buried is a gripping read."--Meg Gardiner, Edgar Award-winning author of China Lake and Ransom River "[An] offbeat tale of ruthless mobsters in Glasgow. . . . A brainy, barbed noir, this book takes its time setting the scene and establishing its characters. Most of its violence occurs off the page. But with its contrasting characters (it's easy to envision a series built around the endearing Jasmine), local color and language and skillfully orchestrated sense of bad things to come, the novel maintains a solid grip on the reader. Brookmyre isn't as well-known in the States as fellow Scottish mystery writers Ian Rankin, Val McDermid and Denise Mina, but this first-rate effort may change that."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "[A] smartly written mainstream detective story . . . Brookymre deftly twists one case around the other."--Marilyn Stasio, New York Times Book Review "[Brookmyre] is a Scottish writer popular in the United Kingdom but not so much in the United States--an unfortunate reality that this funny, tragic and satisfying novel should help to alter. . . . Brookmyre's style is slangy and assured but never aloof."--Chicago Tribune "Tough Scottish humor . . . leavened with Elmore Leonard-like flourishes.. . . finely controlled yet exuberant mayhem."--The Christian Science Monitor "Brookmre is off in a new direction in this straight-ahead crime thriller . . . [For] fans of Lynda La Plante's "Prime Suspect" series and HBO's The Wire."--Library Journal "Brookmyre introduces Det. Insp. Catherine McLeod and PI Jasmine Sharp in her solid first entry in a new Glasgow crime series. . . . Corruption, betrayal, and gallows humor fuel the noir plot, while family problems lend emotional depth."--Publishers Weekly "Brookmyre, well known in Great Britain for mixing black comedy into his thrillers, has veered toward a semiconventional procedural here, but he spikes his tale with internal police intrigues, bent coppers, and assorted ne'er-do-wells. . . . Well sketched, and almost every character is supplied some cynical, funny dialogue. . . . It's Brookmyre's sense of the city and its no-nuance criminals that makes this one a winner."--Booklist "Where the Bodies Are Buried is mainstream Glasgow noir, and it proves [Brookmyre] to be just as excellent at the gritty, serious end of the genre as he was dispensing manic humor."--The Times (London) "A strident blast of the trumpet to wake up crime fiction readers everywhere."--Val McDermid "Premier-league crime writing."--Mark Billingham "[Brookmyre's] writing is as sharply observed and mordantly funny as ever. . . . There are plenty of back-doubles and plot twists in this fast-paced read."--The Guardian "Brookmyre is one of those fascinating individuals who sees and knows exactly what nicely toned written text looks like, jovially chooses to ignore it, and lowers the bar to a level of utterly brutal and fantastic indecency that is an absolute pleasure to read."--Edinburgh STV "A pacy, witty thriller that marks a new chapter for [Brookmyre]."--The Scotsman Glasgow s mean streets come alive, and author Brookmyre puts his readers in the shoes of the people who walk them. Surely Where the Bodies are Buried is one of the best novels of the year. John Lutz, "New York Times" bestselling and Edgar award-winning author "Sharp, crafty, hard-edged and full of heart"Where the Bodies Are Buried" is a gripping read."Meg Gardiner, Edgar Award-winning author of "China Lake" and "Ransom River" [An] offbeat tale of ruthless mobsters in Glasgow. . . . A brainy, barbed noir, this book takes its time setting the scene and establishing its characters. Most of its violence occurs off the page. But with its contrasting characters (it s easy to envision a series built around the endearing Jasmine), local color and language and skillfully orchestrated sense of bad things to come, the novel maintains a solid grip on the reader. Brookmyre isn t as well-known in the States as fellow Scottish mystery writers Ian Rankin, Val McDermid and Denise Mina, but this first-rate effort may change that. "Kirkus Reviews (starred review)" [A] smartly written mainstream detective story . . . Brookymre deftly twists one case around the other. Marilyn Stasio, "New York Times Book Review" [Brookmyre] is a Scottish writer popular in the United Kingdom but not so much in the United Statesan unfortunate reality that this funny, tragic and satisfying novel should help to alter. . . . Brookmyre's style is slangy and assured but never aloof. "Chicago Tribune" Tough Scottish humor . . . leavened with Elmore Leonard-like flourishes.. . . finely controlled yet exuberant mayhem. "The Christian Science Monitor" Brookmre is off in a new direction in this straight-ahead crime thriller . . . [For] fans of Lynda La Plante s Prime Suspect series and HBO s The Wire. "Library Journal" Brookmyre introduces Det. Insp. Catherine McLeod and PI Jasmine Sharp in her solid first entry in a new Glasgow crime series. . . . Corruption, betrayal, and gallows humor fuel the noir plot, while family problems lend emotional depth. "Publishers Weekly" Brookmyre, well known in Great Britain for mixing black comedy into his thrillers, has veered toward a semiconventional procedural here, but he spikes his tale with internal police intrigues, bent coppers, and assorted ne er-do-wells. . . . Well sketched, and almost every character is supplied some cynical, funny dialogue. . . . It s Brookmyre s sense of the city and its no-nuance criminals that makes this one a winner. "Booklist" Where the Bodies Are Buried is mainstream Glasgow noir, and it proves [Brookmyre] to be just as excellent at the gritty, serious end of the genre as he was dispensing manic humor. "The Times" (London) A strident blast of the trumpet to wake up crime fiction readers everywhere. Val McDermid Premier-league crime writing. Mark Billingham [Brookmyre s] writing is as sharply observed and mordantly funny as ever. . . . There are plenty of back-doubles and plot twists in this fast-paced read. "The Guardian" Brookmyre is one of those fascinating individuals who sees and knows exactly what nicely toned written text looks like, jovially chooses to ignore it, and lowers the bar to a level of utterly brutal and fantastic indecency that is an absolute pleasure to read. Edinburgh STV A pacy, witty thriller that marks a new chapter for [Brookmyre]. The Scotsman" "Glasgow's mean streets come alive, and author Brookmyre puts his readers in the shoes of the people who walk them. Surely Where the Bodies are Buried is one of the best novels of the year."--John Lutz, "New York Times" bestselling and Edgar award-winning author "Sharp, crafty, hard-edged and full of heart--"Where the Bodies Are Buried" is a gripping read."--Meg Gardiner, Edgar Award-winning author of "China Lake" and "Ransom River" "[An] offbeat tale of ruthless mobsters in Glasgow. . . . A brainy, barbed noir, this book takes its time setting the scene and establishing its characters. Most of its violence occurs off the page. But with its contrasting characters (it's easy to envision a series built around the endearing Jasmine), local color and language and skillfully orchestrated sense of bad things to come, the novel maintains a solid grip on the reader. Brookmyre isn't as well-known in the States as fellow Scottish mystery writers Ian Rankin, Val McDermid and Denise Mina, but this first-rate effort may change that."--"Kirkus Reviews (starred review)" "[A] smartly written mainstream detective story . . . Brookymre deftly twists one case around the other."--Marilyn Stasio, "New York Times Book Review" "[Brookmyre] is a Scottish writer popular in the United Kingdom but not so much in the United States--an unfortunate reality that this funny, tragic and satisfying novel should help to alter. . . . Brookmyre's style is slangy and assured but never aloof."--"Chicago Tribune" "Tough Scottish humor . . . leavened with Elmore Leonard-like flourishes.. . . finely controlled yet exuberant mayhem."--"The Christian Science Monitor" "Brookmre is off in a new direction in this straight-ahead crime thriller . . . [For] fans of Lynda La Plante's "Prime Suspect" series and HBO's The Wire."--"Library Journal" "Brookmyre introduces Det. Insp. Catherine McLeod and PI Jasmine Sharp in her solid first entry in a new Glasgow crime s

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