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Henderson's Boys

Grey Wolves: Book 4 (Henderson's Boys)

By Robert Muchamore

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Format: Paperback, 464 pages
Published In: United Kingdom, 01 March 2011

Product Description:

'Muchamore's plain, punchy,often funny style ... is highly effective. This clever, tense novel is a great way of getting bored boys interested in history.' (The Escape) Amanda Craig, The Times 'It has the feel of something quite big and satisfying...Muchamore's voice is fresh and direct.' (The Escape) The Daily Telegraph Mixes espionage and gritty realism when dealing with children in the midst of a war Waterstones Quarterly, March 610mThis book was un-putdownable. It gripped me from start to finish, and was just as good as the CHERUB series, if not better.' (The Escape) Aaron, 14, First News Praise for books in the CHERUB series: 'Punchy, exciting, glamorous and, what's more, you'll completely wish it was true.' The Sunday Express A stunning read for anyone, a real gem in the Henderson's Boys series that has already flown off the shelves. First News The action hurtles along at break-neck speed. NATE

Promotional Information

The fourth adventure in the Henderson's Boys series: find out how CHERUB began!

About the Author

Robert Muchamore was born in Islington in 1972 and spent thirteen years working as a private investigator. He loves Arsenal and watching people fall down holes. He hates swimming and getting chased by cows. He was inspired to start writing by his nephews' complaints about the lack of anything for them to read!The CHERUB series has now become a number one bestseller in several countries. For more information, go to www.muchamore.com.

Reviews

The action hurtles along at break-neck speed. * NATE * A stunning read for anyone, a real gem in the Henderson's Boys series that has already flown off the shelves. * First News * Praise for books in the CHERUB series: 'Punchy, exciting, glamorous and, what's more, you'll completely wish it was true.' * The Sunday Express * 'This book was un-putdownable. It gripped me from start to finish, and was just as good as the CHERUB series, if not better.' (The Escape) * Aaron, 14, First News * Mixes espionage and gritty realism when dealing with children in the midst of a war * Waterstones Quarterly, March 2009 * 'It has the feel of something quite big and satisfying...Muchamore's voice is fresh and direct.' (The Escape) * The Daily Telegraph * Muchamore is single-handedly turning a lot of young boys back on to reading * Bournemouth Daily Echo * 'Muchamore's plain, punchy,often funny style ... is highly effective. This clever, tense novel is a great way of getting bored boys interested in history.' (The Escape) * Amanda Craig, The Times * Muachamore just keeps on improving when you think he can't! -- Harry Griffiths, aged 14 * First News * A must-read for all teenagers * Woman's Way * The action hurtles along at break-neck speed * NATE Classroom * There wasn't a boring chapter * The Guardian *

EAN: 9780340999165
ISBN: 0340999160
Publisher: Hachette Children's
Dimensions: 19.7 x 13 x 2.9 centimetres (0.32 kg)
Age Range: 15+ years
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2 review(s)
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Alex on
+1
Great book and read. Typical robert muchamore - fast paced, lots of action and you will probably read it in one sitting. A definite must for any james bond or alex rider fan. Though robert muchamore is much better. Also, a note to people worried about ordering from the uk - it only took a week for it to arrive, with free postage and everything. The best service out there.
Vijay on
 
The Following are my impressions from today's screening in Toronto.

I suggest you don't read this review, or any for that matter. Forget the Venice stuff, and the hissing at Toronto. Go to this film with an open mind.

But if you're still hereā€¦.

I suppose I had a lot of expectations going into The Fountain. Besides the 6 year wait, I truly believed in Aronofsky's potential as a filmmaker. I knew that given the right material (and the right budget) Aronofsky could really make something great.

From the moment the film began, thought, my expectations were completely shattered. I went in thinking I knew what this film would be, but the film proved to completely different. I thought I was going to see a Darren Aronofsky film as I knew them to be, complete with his usual cinematic vocabulary. Gone are the hip hop montages, the split screens, the snorri cam shots. This film worked on a completely different level, which wasn't a bad thing by any means. Just different. It took some getting used to, and I definitely think a second viewing with help with the acclimation (Thankfully, I only have to wait two weeks for Fantastic Fest!!)

In fact, as Aronofsky pointed at the introduction to the film on Tuesday, The Fountain and his previous efforts are completely different. Don't get me wrong. The Fountain is still very much an Aronofsky film in its dizzying use of dozes of layers of thematic ideas, dazzling visuals, and emotionally crippling narratives.

But things feel different this time around. It all boils down the fact that I've simply never had to process a film like The Fountain before, which leaves me both confused and amazed. The structure of the film is pretty much old news by now. Tomas, Tommy, Tom Creo is a man of three different times (1500 Spain & New America, 2006 America, 2500 Space). In the past he is a conquistador struggling to find the tree of life for his queen, Isabella. In the present he is a cancer research specialist struggling to find a cure for the cancer killing his wife, Izzy. And in the future, Tom, a combination of the past and present meditates in deep space, with painful memories and hopes of a solution to his single greatest need.

Once the film shifts into the third act, which is difficult to pinpoint since much of the movie plays like three separate third acts, the film goes into overdrive, relying most on images and the music of Clint Mansell (with Kronos Quarter & Mogwai). It's a powerful conclusion, and while not completely spelled out, more than wraps everything up. More than that, its the most satisfying 20 minutes of film I've seen in a long time.

Visually, the film is nothing short of spectacular. Aronofsky did the right thing by not relying solely on computers. Instead, he assembled a hodge-podge of effects crews including Peter Parks crew (microphotography) as well as his long time collaborator (and once roommate) Jeremy Dawson of Amoeba Proteus (Aronofsky and Dawson's SFX company). The visual tapestry they create is jaw-dropping. Trust me. You've never (and most likely will never) seen stuff like this on screen.

The score by Clint Mansell also surprised me. I guess I was expecting Requiem for a Dream II. The music plays throughout most of the film, with only one or two scenes operating in silence. The music is never triumphant (as I thought it would be) and instead creates an organic rhythm that is finally granted release in the most spectacular moment in the film. Sorry, I'm not giving that away. Mogwai's contribution seems to function mostly in the 1500 time period, giving the period piece quite a unique and dangerous edge to it. Of course, the Kronos Quartet amazes again, and really provides the score with some emotion. Those Clint Mansell fans who happen to like his composition, "The Last Man" will be happy to know that the theme is prevalent throughout much of the film, and plays over the closing credits.

The editing of the film must've been a large challenge to get right, but for the most part they get it. The film uses a lot of fades, which gives the film a feeling of breathing, of a heart beat. It sets up an interesting rhythm which accelerates as Tommy gets more frantic.

Thematically, the films delves into some pretty heavy territory. There is a scene in the film involving Tommy after Izzy's death which left me feeling uneasy about Tommy's character and where the film was taking me. He decides to continue on with his research, revealing a darker shade of Tommy's character. The Fountain is not an easy film emotionally, and those expecting a Hollywood treatment of the concept of death will be surprised. The Fountain is about accepting death, which is something most people aren't ready to do. I admit I'm not sure if I'm ready to deal with that. However, if the Fountain is even half right about the implications of death, there's really nothing to fear.

Again, The Fountain really surprised me. I wasn't expecting it to turn out the way it did. Instead of being the movie I wanted it to be, it was the movie I'd never even imagined. The Fountain is a beautiful film, and I'm thankful that Warner Bros.gave this film a chance. Thank you, WB & Regency. Forget the reviews, (including this one) and go see this movie for yourself. Give into it. Love the characters Tommy & Izzy as Aronofsky intended. If you do, I promise you the experience will be a completely rewarding one.

Finally, thank you to everyone involved in the making of The Fountain. It was truly a rewarding experience, and worth the wait.

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