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Hanging up
By

Rating
"HILARIOUS. . . A CHARMING, ENTERTAINING READ."
--Los Angeles Times
"WONDERFUL. . . Eve Mozell is having a lousy day, and she hasn't even gotten past breakfast yet. Her father, a senile ex-alcoholic whose idea of a good joke is goosing his woman doctor, started phoning Eve at 6 a.m. Her teenage son, who alternately ignores and lectures her, is off to a seance. ('You know, Mom, all doors are entrances. Think about it.') And a quick glance in the mirror turns out to be a big mistake. Oh, God, is that my face? . . . I need a vacation. No. This is just me. Me at forty-four. . . . What a terrific debut."
--Newsweek
"TRUE AND TOUCHING."
--People
"Delia Ephron is blessed with the driest of wits, the tenderest of hearts, and an uncanny ear for the way people really talk. Do yourself a favor and curl up with Hanging Up--but unplug the phone first."
--Armistead Maupin
"MOVING AND FUNNY. . . In some ways, Hanging Up is a funhouse version of King Lear."
--Newsday

"From the Trade Paperback edition."

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Reviews

The telephone plays an integral part in screenwriter and nonfiction author Ephron's (How to Eat Like a Child) humorous, if somewhat uncomfortable, look at the senility and death of a parent. Narrator Eve Mozell loves to chat on the phone, playing out nearly all of her relationships by talking into a plastic mouthpiece. Now 44 but still in the role of the unremarkable, overcompensating middle daughter, Eve finds the care of her elderly, alcoholic father foisted upon her by her sisters Georgia, an overbearing magazine editor, and Madeline, a dippy soap opera actress. With little support from either her work-absorbed husband, a public radio commentator, or her teenaged son, Eve struggles to understand the Mozell family neuroses. Flashbacks highlight her parents' scotch-soaked divorce, her mother's subsequent abandonment of the family and her father's descent into alcoholism and general obnoxiousness. Appropriately, a telephone relationship with a stranger helps Eve come to terms with the simultaneous love and disgust she feels for her father. All the phone talk makes the narrative dialogue-heavy, and most of Ephron's characters are gratingly self-absorbed. However, Eve's wry humor and gentle tolerance for these eccentrics and the foibles of life leaven the proceedings nicely, rendering this a novel few readers will hang up on. (July)

" Compassionate, funny, and tremendously satisfying." --The New York Times Book Review " HILARIOUS . . . A CHARMING, ENTERTAINING READ." --Los Angeles Times " WONDERFUL . . . Eve Mozell is having a lousy day, and she hasn't even gotten past breakfast yet. Her father, a senile ex-alcoholic whose idea of a good joke is goosing his woman doctor, started phoning Eve at 6 a.m. Her teenage son, who alternately ignores and lectures her, is off to a se ance. ('You know, Mom, all doors are entrances. Think about it.') And a quick glance in the mirror turns out to be a big mistake. 'Oh God, is that my face? . . . I need a vacation. No. This is just me. Me at forty-four.' . . . What a terrific debut." --Newsweek " MOVING AND FUNNY. . . IN SOME WAYS, HANGING UP IS A FUN-HOUSE VERSION OF KING LEAR." --Newsday " TRUE AND TOUCHING." --People " Delia Ephron is blessed with the driest of wits, the tenderest of hearts, and an uncanny ear for the way people really talk. Do yourself a favor and curl up with Hanging Up--but unplug the phone first." --ARMISTEAD MAUPIN

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