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Great Small Fiats
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Table of Contents

The chapters are now (200906): 01 Introduction 02 Topolino 03 600 04 Millecento 05 500 06 850 07 128 08 127 09 126 10 Panda 11 Uno 12 Cinquecento 13 Seicento 14 Nuova Panda 15 Trepiuno (Nuova 500) 16 Autobianchi 17 Etceterini 18 Fiats made under licence Appendices Index

About the Author

Trained as a photographer in the Royal Air Force, Phil served for 20 years, mainly in aerial reconnaissance and combat photography. He then worked for eight years in the BBC as a film engineering manager at Ealing Studios. Author of three motoring books based on Fiats, Phil became editor of Italian Cars and Ferrari World Magazines and later created Auto Italia Magazine, the world s leading publication on Italian cars.

Reviews

Fiat Club Africa, October 2007
A Great Small Book on Great Small Fiats - Christmas present time
Great Small Fiats is a new book written by Phil Ward, the editor and creator of Auto Italia, and published by Veloce.
The bottom line is any person with even a vague interest in the smaller Fiats over the last 70 years or so, will be well advised to drop liberal hints to all and sundry likely donors to help fill their Christmas stocking.
Phil has put together a very interesting book with plenty of interesting and little-known facts and stories, making for a great read and addition to any aficionado's library. As you would expect, where Phil has been able to include his photos, these are of great quality.
While I always believed that I have had more than a decent knowledge and appreciation for the smaller Fiats, I like the big ones too, there are several pieces of information I found intriguing particularly on the cars we did not see in South Africa. Having said that, this is not a book of facts and figures, it is the stories that make for the entertaining read. There are notes on buying, running and restoring each of the models.
There are contemporary driving impressions of both standard and modified cars for comparison purposes and a mine of information on Fiats made under other labels, Abarth to Zastava.
Well worthwhile.

Parliamo Magazine, October 2007 -Fiat Motor Club
Christmas present for a Fiat petrolhead?
The first three pages gives the reader an insight into the oldest Fiats that were produced and the story continues right up to the modern Panda and the long awaited, much anticipated New 500.
The photography is very good and this book is totally absorbing and would make an ideal present for any Fiat petrolhead that you know (or you could even treat yourself to a copy). I think it is worth every penny. Roll on Christmas is what I say!

The Automobile, January 2008
Reviewing more or less every Fiat model with at least one of the range being a liter or less, this starts with the Topolino and ends with the impending introduction of this year's second generation Nuova 500. In between, that covers chonologically 600, Millecento, Nuova 500, 850, 128, 127, 126, Panda, Uno, Cinquecento, Seicento and Nuova Panda, as well as Autobianchis, Abarths, Polskis, Seats, Padminis, Zastavas and the products of the various specialists who used Fiats as their bases. With plenty of illustrations, this is a good reminder of the way Fiat responded to, or created, the Italian market's desire for economy cars with a bit of sporting flair. There is a useful set of specifications of each model at the end.

Fleet Transport, December 2007
Irish magazine
Fiat is best known for its pedigree in designing and producing small, economical cars that are full of character. 'Great Small Fiats' written by Phil Ward is a delightful 176 page paperback chronicles all the small Fiats and other small cars based on Fiats. Trained as a photographer, Phil traces this concept from the birth of the 500A 'Topolino' in the 1930s up to the current Panda, right up to the newly crowned 'Car of the Year' Fiat 500.
The chapters include practical information on buying and running a small Fiat and restoration advice for the older cars.
Australian Classic Car, November 2007
Australian magazine
I haven't visited Rome yet but I understand that its roads are choked gutter to gutter with Fiat 500s. It you love small Fiats but can't get to Rome, perhaps this book is for you. Ward starts with the origins of the Italian manufacturer before looking at the first Fiat Topolino released in 1936 and staying in production until well after WW2. Next was the famed 500 that brought the company to the notice of motorists worldwide. The many derivatives, including the Abarth versions, are shown, a reminder that the little car wasn't at all well-received when new, prompting Fiat to increase its power and improve trim levels. The 850 Sedan and Sports followed, then the 128, 127 and 126 at about the time when Fiat left the Australian market. That doesn't mean that Fiat hasn't been busy in Europe in the meantime. They produced the Panda, Uno and Polish built Cinquecento and Seicento, and everyone is pleased to see Fiat back on the Australian market.
The book looks closely at the Nueva 500 and recalls those Fiat-based marques Autobianchi, Siata and Moretti. There is also a chapter on the myriad tuners and coachbuilders that have used Fiat components in their vehicles. Very useful for European car enthusiasts.
Fleet Transport, December 2007
Irish magazine
Fiat is best known for its pedigree in designing and producing small, economical cars that are full of character. 'Great Small Fiats' written by Phil Ward is a delightful 176 page paperback chronicles all the small Fiats and other small cars based on Fiats. Trained as a photographer, Phil traces this concept from the birth of the 500A 'Topolino' in the 1930s up to the current Panda, right up to the newly crowned 'Car of the Year' Fiat 500.
The chapters include practical information on buying and running a small Fiat and restoration advice for the older cars.
totalkitcar.com, January 2008
UK website Since Fiat Auto was founded in 1899, they've produced millions of vehicles. Many have frankly been uninspiring, but they have always had an ability to produce small, economical and character cars. Among their 'back catalogue' have been some fine machines. This cracking book, from ace publishers Veloce, tracks this winning concept from the first of the breed, the 500A 'Topolino' in the thirties, right up to the brand new 'Nuevo' 500. Each of the carefully selected models is described in infinite detail from conception as a Fiat model, to current ownership in the hands of collectors and enthusiasts. There are chapters including practical information on buying and running a small Fiat and restoration advice for older cars. A nice touch is the inclusion of the interesting models built under license outside Italy and also the Fiat-devised 'etceterini' coach built and competition cars. A charming and recommended book.
Fleet Transport, December 2007
Irish magazine

Fiat is best known for its pedigree in designing and producing small, economical cars that are full of character. 'Great Small Fiats' written by Phil Ward is a delightful 176 page paperback chronicles all the small Fiats and other small cars based on Fiats. Trained as a photographer, Phil traces this concept from the birth of the 500A 'Topolino' in the 1930s up to the current Panda, right up to the newly crowned 'Car of the Year' Fiat 500.

The chapters include practical information on buying and running a small Fiat and restoration advice for the older cars.
Australian Classic Car, November 2007
Australian magazine

I haven't visited Rome yet but I understand that its roads are choked gutter to gutter with Fiat 500s. It you love small Fiats but can't get to Rome, perhaps this book is for you. Ward starts with the origins of the Italian manufacturer before looking at the first Fiat Topolino released in 1936 and staying in production until well after WW2. Next was the famed 500 that brought the company to the notice of motorists worldwide. The many derivatives, including the Abarth versions, are shown, a reminder that the little car wasn't at all well-received when new, prompting Fiat to increase its power and improve trim levels. The 850 Sedan and Sports followed, then the 128, 127 and 126 at about the time when Fiat left the Australian market. That doesn't mean that Fiat hasn't been busy in Europe in the meantime. They produced the Panda, Uno and Polish built Cinquecento and Seicento, and everyone is pleased to see Fiat back on the Australian market.

The book looks closely at the Nueva 500 and recalls those Fiat-based marques Autobianchi, Siata and Moretti. There is also a chapter on the myriad tuners and coachbuilders that have used Fiat components in their vehicles. Very useful for European car enthusiasts.
totalkitcar.com, January 2008
UK websiteSince Fiat Auto was founded in 1899, they've produced millions of vehicles. Many have frankly been uninspiring, but they have always had an ability to produce small, economical and character cars. Among their 'back catalogue' have been some fine machines. This cracking book, from ace publishers Veloce, tracks this winning concept from the first of the breed, the 500A 'Topolino' in the thirties, right up to the brand new 'Nuevo' 500. Each of the carefully selected models is described in infinite detail from conception as a Fiat model, to current ownership in the hands of collectors and enthusiasts. There are chapters including practical information on buying and running a small Fiat and restoration advice for older cars. A nice touch is the inclusion of the interesting models built under license outside Italy and also the Fiat-devised 'etceterini' coach built and competition cars. A charming and recommended book.
"With 170 information and image-filled pages, this softcover is a great resource for lovers of the brand." - Hemmings Sports & Exotic

The Automobile, January 2008

Reviewing more or less every Fiat model with at least one of the range being a liter or less, this starts with the Topolino and ends with the impending introduction of this year's second generation Nuova 500. In between, that covers chonologically 600, Millecento, Nuova 500, 850, 128, 127, 126, Panda, Uno, Cinquecento, Seicento and Nuova Panda, as well as Autobianchis, Abarths, Polskis, Seats, Padminis, Zastavas and the products of the various specialists who used Fiats as their bases. With plenty of illustrations, this is a good reminder of the way Fiat responded to, or created, the Italian market's desire for economy cars with a bit of sporting flair. There is a useful set of specifications of each model at the end.

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