Australasia's Biggest Online Store

Shop over a million Toys in our Huge New Range

Good Game
By

Rating
Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction1. Sports and the Early Church2. Controlling and Proscribing Sport3. Bowling, Bicycles, and Other Snares of the Devil4. The Church Heads for the Playground5. The Rise of Sports Evangelism6. Christians and the Killer Instinct7. Building and Sacking the Temple8. Sport and the Sub-Christian Values9. Touchdowns and Slam Dunks for Jesus10. Prayer Out of Bounds11. Notes Toward a Well-Played Game

About the Author

Shirl James Hoffman is Professor Emeritus of Exercise and Sport Science at University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The Executive Director of the American Kinesiology Association, he is the author of Sport and Religion and the editor of Introduction to Kinesiology: Studying Physical Activity, now in its third edition.

Reviews

"Wonderful! This is an amazing achievement, blending sociological expertise, theological savvy, and profound spiritual sensitivities." --Richard J. Mouw, President and Professor of Christian Philosophy, Fuller Theological Seminary "This should be required reading for every thoughtful Christian." --Robert K. Johnston, author of The Christian at Play Tom Krattenmaker's recent Onward Christian Athletes (2009) explored the efforts of the Christian Right to join evangelical Christianity with professional sports. Here Hoffman takes a slightly different approach to what is essentially the same subject, tackling the relationship between faith and sports from a more ideological perspective. He suggests that while evangelical Christian groups are forging connections with sports (because sports is a high-profile platform), they really don't understand the nature of sports. He explores the fundamental paradox of joining sports (which encourages and celebrates success) to religion (which "consistently stresses the importance of losing"). The essential problem, he says, is that, in harnessing itself to sports, the Christian community doesn't really have a clear sense of its goal or a coherent plan to achieve it. As a result, sport is becoming, in many ways, a mockery of Christianity, a superficial set of rites and behaviors with no spiritual or philosophical foundation. Many readers may disagree with the author's thesis, but even they will agree that he supports it abundantly and argues it well. -- Booklist Magazine, 2010 The breadth of [Hoffman's] knowledge of the history of sport, especially in its relationship to religion, and his keen insights into what it might mean to think Christianly about sports contribute to a readable and impassioned plea for more careful and more spiritual reflection about what sports have come to mean for us and our world.i"? -- Journal for the Sociological Integration of Religion and Society [ Good Game ] will open your eyes to ideas and knowledge that may have never crossed your mind. -- Hard Music Magazine

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Look for similar items by category
People also searched for
How Fishpond Works
Fishpond works with suppliers all over the world to bring you a huge selection of products, really great prices, and delivery included on over 25 million products that we sell. We do our best every day to make Fishpond an awesome place for customers to shop and get what they want — all at the best prices online.
Webmasters, Bloggers & Website Owners
You can earn a 5% commission by selling Good Game: Christianity and the Culture of Sports on your website. It's easy to get started - we will give you example code. After you're set-up, your website can earn you money while you work, play or even sleep! You should start right now!
Authors / Publishers
Are you the Author or Publisher of a book? Or the manufacturer of one of the millions of products that we sell. You can improve sales and grow your revenue by submitting additional information on this title. The better the information we have about a product, the more we will sell!
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond.com, Inc.
Back to top