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Freedom and Necessity
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About the Author

The author of the bestselling "Vlad Taltos" novels (Dragon, Issola, Dzur, etc) and standalone fantasies such as To Reign in Hell, Steven Brust lives in Las Vegas, Nevada. Emma Bull, author of War for the Oaks and Finder, lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Reviews

Where can you read about Marx, Engels, and Napoleon Bonaparte, plus numerous other historic characters in one book? In this new fantasy novel by Brust (Agyar, LJ 2/15/94) and Bull (Finder, LJ 2/15/93), that's where. Although the body of James Cobham has not been found, he is assumed to have drowned in an accident in 1849. Two months after the accident, his cousin, Richard, receives a letter from James annoucing that he is alive and in hiding, but he can't recall the past two months. Richard writes back, advising James to stay in hiding because he suspects foul play. The correspondence unfolds among several characters and reveals James's mysterious past. Resembling the works of Tolstoy and Dickens in the plethora of characters, Stoker in the and Mary Shelly in the presented exposition, the novel brings together intrigue, adventure, politics, and magic in a complex epic that astonishes the reader. Although the format is occasionally cumbersome, the story is interesting enough to keep the reader turning pages. Recommended for libraries with strong sf/fantasy collections.‘Georgia Panos, Johnson Cty. Lib. System, Leawood, Kan.

"One of the most impressive novels I've read in a long time." --"Locus"

" Resembling the works of Tolstoy and Dickens in the plethora of characters, Stoker and Mary Shelley in the exposition, the novel brings together intrigue, adventure, politics, and magic in a complex epic that astonishes the reader." -- "Library Journal" on "Freedom and Necessity"""

" Complex and masterly . . . A skilful act of ventriloquism, faithfully reproducing the argot of the early Victorian upper classes with only a few lapses, and plausibily weaving the plot into the politics at the time. Imaginative and finely written." -- "Interzone" on "Freedom and Necessity"

" Expertly styled after a 19th-century English epistolary novel . . . Engaging characters and surprises that, for all their thrills, stem quite naturally from the groundwork that the authors have so cleverly laid." -- "Publishers Weekly" on "Freedom and Necessity"

" One of the most impressive novels I've read in a long time." "-- Locus" on "Freedom and Necessity"

" Brilliantly written as an epistolary novel, rich with historical detail, enlivened by fully drawn characters, this is one of the most unusual and certainly one of the best fantasy novels of the year." -- "Science Fiction Chronicle" on "Freedom and Necessity"
"Resembling the works of Tolstoy and Dickens in the plethora of characters, Stoker and Mary Shelley in the exposition, the novel brings together intrigue, adventure, politics, and magic in a complex epic that astonishes the reader." --"Library Journal" on "Freedom and Necessity"""

"Complex and masterly . . . A skilful act of ventriloquism, faithfully reproducing the argot of the early Victorian upper classes with only a few lapses, and plausibily weaving the plot into the politics at the time. Imaginative and finely written." --"Interzone" on "Freedom and Necessity"

"Expertly styled after a 19th-century English epistolary novel . . . Engaging characters and surprises that, for all their thrills, stem quite naturally from the groundwork that the authors have so cleverly laid."--"Publishers Weekly" on "Freedom and Necessity"

"One of the most impressive novels I've read in a long time.""--Locus" on "Freedom and Necessity"

"Brilliantly written as an epistolary novel, rich with historical detail, enlivened by fully drawn characters, this is one of the most unusual and certainly one of the best fantasy novels of the year." --"Science Fiction Chronicle" on "Freedom and Necessity"

Resembling the works of Tolstoy and Dickens in the plethora of characters, Stoker and Mary Shelley in the exposition, the novel brings together intrigue, adventure, politics, and magic in a complex epic that astonishes the reader. "Library Journal on Freedom and Necessity" Complex and masterly . . . A skilful act of ventriloquism, faithfully reproducing the argot of the early Victorian upper classes with only a few lapses, and plausibily weaving the plot into the politics at the time. Imaginative and finely written. "Interzone on Freedom and Necessity" Expertly styled after a 19th-century English epistolary novel . . . Engaging characters and surprises that, for all their thrills, stem quite naturally from the groundwork that the authors have so cleverly laid. "Publishers Weekly on Freedom and Necessity" One of the most impressive novels I've read in a long time. "Locus on Freedom and Necessity" Brilliantly written as an epistolary novel, rich with historical detail, enlivened by fully drawn characters, this is one of the most unusual and certainly one of the best fantasy novels of the year. "Science Fiction Chronicle on Freedom and Necessity""


Resembling the works of Tolstoy and Dickens in the plethora of characters, Stoker and Mary Shelley in the exposition, the novel brings together intrigue, adventure, politics, and magic in a complex epic that astonishes the reader. Library Journal on Freedom and Necessity Complex and masterly . . . A skilful act of ventriloquism, faithfully reproducing the argot of the early Victorian upper classes with only a few lapses, and plausibily weaving the plot into the politics at the time. Imaginative and finely written. Interzone on Freedom and Necessity Expertly styled after a 19th-century English epistolary novel . . . Engaging characters and surprises that, for all their thrills, stem quite naturally from the groundwork that the authors have so cleverly laid. Publishers Weekly on Freedom and Necessity One of the most impressive novels I've read in a long time. Locus on Freedom and Necessity Brilliantly written as an epistolary novel, rich with historical detail, enlivened by fully drawn characters, this is one of the most unusual and certainly one of the best fantasy novels of the year. Science Fiction Chronicle on Freedom and Necessity"

"Resembling the works of Tolstoy and Dickens in the plethora of characters, Stoker and Mary Shelley in the exposition, the novel brings together intrigue, adventure, politics, and magic in a complex epic that astonishes the reader." --Library Journal on Freedom and Necessity"Complex and masterly . . . A skilful act of ventriloquism, faithfully reproducing the argot of the early Victorian upper classes with only a few lapses, and plausibily weaving the plot into the politics at the time. Imaginative and finely written." --Interzone on Freedom and Necessity"Expertly styled after a 19th-century English epistolary novel . . . Engaging characters and surprises that, for all their thrills, stem quite naturally from the groundwork that the authors have so cleverly laid." --Publishers Weekly on Freedom and Necessity"One of the most impressive novels I've read in a long time." --Locus on Freedom and Necessity"Brilliantly written as an epistolary novel, rich with historical detail, enlivened by fully drawn characters, this is one of the most unusual and certainly one of the best fantasy novels of the year." --Science Fiction Chronicle on Freedom and Necessity

Top-tier fantasists Brust (Five Hundred Years After) and Bull (War for the Oaks) team up for a historical romance, expertly styled after a 19th-century English epistolary novel, that runs one James Cobham through the gauntlets of three sinister conspiracies. For all the novel's philosophizing (Hegel and Feuerbach are much discussed), it is at heart a romantic mystery-adventure that alternates bloody fights and breathless chases with drawing-room chat. Presumed drowned for much of the book, James must track down his would-be assassins or enemies-including a devil-worshipping cult, a family squabbling over ownership of an ancient estate and forces interested in the pacification of the English proletariat (both Engels and Marx show up at one time or another). First through the assistance of his cousin Richard, later with the help of his witty, spirited cousin Susan, with whom he falls in love, James must make his way through a web of intrigue that stretches across all of England. A clever and horrific twist caps off this intelligent tale, which features engaging characters and surprises that, for all their thrills, stem quite naturally from the groundwork the authors have so cleverly laid. (Mar.)

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