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The 13 Clocks
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The New York Review Children's Collection is pleased to announce that in Fall 2015 we are publishing our first children's books in paperback. James Thurber's fairytale The 13 Clocks is one of the two books that we will publish in paperback this season-a timeless classic of children's literature, and one that has dazzled generations of readers.

About the Author

James Thurber (1894--1961) was one of the outstanding American humorists and cartoonists of the twentieth century, writing nearly forty books, including collections of essays, short stories, fables, and children's stories. He won a Tony Award for his popular Broadway play, A Thurber Carnival. The New York Review Children's Collection publishes The Wonderful O by Thurber (illustrated by Marc Simont). Neil Gaiman is an award-winning author of novels, short stories, children's books, and graphic novels. Among his works are the children's books Coraline, The Wolves in the Walls, and The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; the Sandman graphic novels series; and the fantasy novels Stardust and Smoke and Mirrors. Marc Simont (1915-2013) illustrated nearly one hundred books, working with authors such as Margaret Wise Brown, James Thurber, and Marjorie Weinman Sharmat. He is also the author of several books, and the translator of poems by Garcia Lorca and others. Simont received the Caldecott Medal for his illustrations to A Tree Is Nice by Janice May Udry. He collaborated with Ruth Krauss on The Backward Day (also published by The New York Review Children's Collection) and The Happy Day, which is a Caldecott Honor Book. Simont illustrated James Thurber's The 13 Clocks and The Wonderful O, both available from The New York Review Children's Collection.

Reviews

"It's one of the great kids' books of the last century. It may be the best thing Thurber ever wrote. It's certainly the most fun that anybody can have reading anything aloud." -- Neil Gaiman
..".an eccentric children's story that took apart and lovingly reconstructed the fairy tale long before William Steig wrote Shrek or William Goldman penned "The Princess Bride."" -- "Los Angeles Times"
""The 13 Clocks," first published in 1950, still deserves its reputation as a modern classic, and ranks as one of Thurber's finest works....Thurber pioneers the postmodern, ironic fairy story." --" Publishers Weekly
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"If you like "The Princess Bride" you're going to like ["The 13 Clocks"]." -- Daniel Pinkwater, Weekend Edition, "NPR"
"Everyone who reads to their children knows...to read the stuff that you love, or that you love to roll off your tongue...I'd put in a personal endorsement for James Thurber's "The 13 Clocks" here..." -- "The Guardian"
"There has never been anything like this before, and there will never be anything like this again...[Thurber] takes such delight in the words. It's like it's written by somebody who wants to infect you with his love of words. There are poems hidden in the text. There are places where it wanders into rhyme and out again. There are all of the invented words. The story itself is nonsense in the finest possible way." --Neil Gaiman, interviewed in "The Wall Street Journal"
""The 13 Clocks" is especially wonderful." --"The Washington Post"
"Rich with ogres and oligarchs, riddles and wit. What distinguishes it is not just quixotic imagination but Thurber's inimitable delight in language. The stories beg to be read aloud...Thurber captivates the ear and captures the heart." "Newsweek""

"The 13 Clocks t"ook apart and lovingly reconstructed the fairy tale long before William Steig wrote Shrek or William Goldman penned "The Princess Bride." Sonja Bolle, "The Los Angeles Times"
There are spies, monsters, betrayals, hair s-breadth escapes, spells to be broken and all the usual accouterments, but Thurber gives the proceedings his own particular deadpan
spin . . . It all makes for a rousing concoction of adventure, humor and satire that defies any conventional classification. William Joyce, author of "The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore"
This dark and delightful fable mixes together all the ingredients of traditional tales . . . and comes up with a sublimelyentertaining concoction. . . . Thurber s sly humor and shameless use of puns and wordplay make the story a joy to read out loud. And the suitably mysterious illustrations by Marc Simont add the perfect atmospheric touch to this unusual tale. Terri Schmitz, "The Horn Book"
Rich with ogres and oligarchs, riddles and wit. What distinguishes it is not just quixotic imagination but Thurber s inimitable delight in language. The stories beg to be read
aloud . . . Thurber captivates the ear and captures the heart. "Newsweek"
The 13 Clocks, first published in 1950, still deserves its reputation as a modern classic, and ranks as one of Thurber s finest works . . . .Thurber pioneers the postmodern, ironic fairy story. "Publishers Weekly""


The 13 Clocks took apart and lovingly reconstructed the fairy tale long before William Steig wrote Shrek or William Goldman penned The Princess Bride. Sonja Bolle, The Los Angeles Times
There are spies, monsters, betrayals, hair s-breadth escapes, spells to be broken and all the usual accouterments, but Thurber gives the proceedings his own particular deadpan
spin . . . It all makes for a rousing concoction of adventure, humor and satire that defies any conventional classification. William Joyce, author of The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore
This dark and delightful fable mixes together all the ingredients of traditional tales . . . and comes up with a sublimelyentertaining concoction. . . . Thurber s sly humor and shameless use of puns and wordplay make the story a joy to read out loud. And the suitably mysterious illustrations by Marc Simont add the perfect atmospheric touch to this unusual tale. Terri Schmitz, The Horn Book
Rich with ogres and oligarchs, riddles and wit. What distinguishes it is not just quixotic imagination but Thurber s inimitable delight in language. The stories beg to be read
aloud . . . Thurber captivates the ear and captures the heart. Newsweek
The 13 Clocks, first published in 1950, still deserves its reputation as a modern classic, and ranks as one of Thurber s finest works . . . .Thurber pioneers the postmodern, ironic fairy story. Publishers Weekly"

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